A LiveStreaming Smash of Epic Proportions #edtech

One of my friends told me about a webinar service that would allow you to have multiple people in a session, while simultaneously streaming to YouTube and/or Facebook Live.

She, in essence, created a monster lol.

I had to do this, but to my dismay, I found that it would run me $55/month.  I inquired about an educator discount, but was told there wasn’t one.  So, I had the idea late one night to figure out how to get it for free.  Today, I got to try it out with some friends.  I couldn’t figure out the FB part for free (most services will make you pay), so next time I may try with a third computer and go directly to Facebook Live.  But the rest of this is free.

The purpose of this post is to remember exactly what I did to get it to work.  For that reason, I won’t put in a lot of detail, but most of the stuff is Google-able.

Many thanks to my #EduMatch fam who showed up to help beta test.  We do a weekly podcast, Tweet & Talk, usually every Sunday at 6 PM Eastern, but we are on Spring Break because of holidays and travel.  We will return on May 7.  Today, I decided to play, and wanted to document the journey so that I don’t forget what to do in a month.  This is probably not the best way, but this worked.  I’ll update as I find easier strategies.

Caution: What you are about to read will be extremely geeky.  Again, most of it can be Googled, which is how I learned how to do this.  But I will link tutorials and resources I found useful whenever possible.  Feel free to tweet me @sarahdateechur with any questions.

What You Need

  1. Two laptops (at least one must have a webcam)
  2. A free Zoom account
  3. OBS encoder software
  4. A free Restream.io account
  5. (Mac only) SoundFlower

Pre-Work – YouTube/Periscope/Restream

  1. Schedule a meeting in Zoom.  I think you can make it recurring, which I will do when we start using this for Tweet & Talks.  Share the meeting link with participants.
  2. Get set up with Periscope Producer.
  3. On your YouTube Live page, set up your usual info like you would do in a regular YouTube Live.Screen Shot 2017-04-16 at 6.31.30 PM
  4. On the same page, you also need this information under Encoder Setup.  Get your server URL and stream key.Screen Shot 2017-04-16 at 6.34.22 PM
  5. On Restream.io, when you sign up for an account, add the channels you want.  I added YouTube Stream Now and Periscope.  FB costs extra.  You may need to manually put in the Server URL and Stream Key for each one, or it may do it automatically.  I don’t remember.
  6. On the right hand side of the home screen, find the RTMP URL close to you, and get the URL and Stream Key.  Screen Shot 2017-04-16 at 6.37.37 PM
  7. Download and install SoundFlower if you have a Mac (I don’t think it’s needed for PC).
  8. Open up the OBS app.

Pre-Work: OBS

  1. Go to Settings, then to Stream, then click the drop-down menu at the top and select Custom Streaming Server.  Enter the info you got from Restream.io in Step 6 above. Screen Shot 2017-04-16 at 6.42.43 PM
  2. (Mac Users) Under Audio, set your Desktop Audio to Sunflower (2 Ch). Screen Shot 2017-04-16 at 6.45.17 PM.png
  3. Click OK, which will close you out of Settings
  4. Add a new Scene and call it whatever you want.
  5. Under Sources, add Window Capture, and Audio Input Capture.
  6. Click the gear next to Audio Input Capture, and select Device: Soundflower (2 Ch).
  7. On the Mixer, bring the Mic/Aux down to 0.  You may also need to bring the Audio Input Capture down to 0 if you end up getting an echo. Adjust Desktop Audio to your liking, so that it doesn’t peak, but still registers sound.Screen Shot 2017-04-16 at 6.48.21 PM.png
  8. You can now close OBS and everything else until you are ready to go live.

The Main Event – 20 min before showtime

  1. Start your Zoom meeting and have participants join about 10 minutes prior to showtime to check audio.  This will also buy you time to get set up on the back end.
  2. (for Mac…not sure how this works on PC) Turn off your mic in your computer system settings.  In Zoom, click the drop-down menu next to the microphone, and make sure to make the Speaker go to SoundFlower (2 Ch). Turn your camera off.Screen Shot 2017-04-16 at 6.56.57 PM.png
  3. Open OBS, and click on the Scene you set up in step 4 (above).
  4. Click on Window Capture and click the gear.  Select from the drop-down menu the Zoom window with your participants.
  5. From the other computer: Join the meeting as a participant. Adjust the width and height of your Window Capture, to your liking.  Invite other participants.
  6. When you are ready to go, click Start Streaming.
  7. Open Periscope app and go to your settings.  Then click on Periscope producer.
  8. It should check for the source.  If there are any issues, fix them in OBS, then click Preview, and then go live.

This is a lot of info, but it presumably will get easier every time.  In addition, I’m sure there are some extra things I am doing that I will find that I can eliminate.  I would love to hear your ideas to see if there’s a way to streamline this.  I will keep updating as I find better ways.  Also, I would love to know if anyone knows how to go to Facebook Live for free.  Thanks for reading!

A Little Something for #NationalPoetryMonth

My friend Shervette told us in the EduMatch voxer group that it’s #NationalPoetryMonth.  She posted some great poems, and invited us to do the same:

I’ve been writing poetry and songs for a while, but most of them don’t see the light of day, as I usually write them to process.  I’ll share a couple today…most are still not ready for the public lol, but that’s ok.

Poem 1 11/21/12

I’m trying to be a better me
Don’t know what I was thinking all these years
All of these tears shed late at night while lying in my bed
And for what? No moves being made
Seeking fame, trying to play the game best that I thought
But it got me nothing
No peace within
Nobody wins when you’re always out for self
I came from noble roots and the noble truth of the matter is other people need my help
My mama told me to keep my eyes on the prize
I got the tools in my hand but I didn’t realize
That noble truth
Shining bright in the darkest night
Gotta reach deep down and find the strength to fight
It’s going to be alright
Gotta add spark to the light
Once I get it popping I can make this right
But where do I begin? So many mouths around
Screaming out for help without even making a sound
The world is grimy, they’re all saying come and find me
All these years had tunnel vision, no side view mirrors up to guide me
The voice inside me saying “take” now screaming “give”
The voice inside me once yelling “die” now saying “live”
It’s about time I’ve had a change of heart
But now that I woke up, where am I supposed to start?

Poem 2 12/2/12

She was a girl from the suburbs
Nothing much to report
But she was one of a kind, she was brighter
Which is kind of why nobody liked her
One day in gym, she looked up and saw him
She never had seen him before
He was tall, he was fly, he was handsome
He smiled as he walked through the door
Much older than a boy of fourteen, it seemed
Just as she was learning to drive
“What the hell,” she thought, “he’s a freshman,
Wouldn’t hurt to give it a try.”
The friends grew closer over the years
He comforted her when she shed tears
But one day, the worst of her fears
She asked him to prom, he said no
And she felt so alone

He was a boy from the suburbs
Everyone said he was a teddy bear
Over six feet tall, he was cuddly
Had a smile that could make you fall in love
He didn’t see her forever it seemed
Then one day in the most unlikely place
He looked to his left and saw her face
He asked her what’s up and the old friends caught up
On life after graduation
He got her number, and they started dating
But one day it all fell apart, and she stopped picking up the phone
And he felt so alone

A few years later, the woman had a breakup
The man called her up, as he saw it on Facebook
They met up for lunch, he said she’s the marrying kind
And he was surprised she wasn’t somebody’s wife
He told her she’s beautiful, she wasn’t used to hearing
She had to bite her lip to keep from tearing
By the time lunch was over, they planned to meet again
Then a week later, she found out she’d lost him
And I felt so alone

It’s been three years, felt like yesterday
But the sound of your voice is starting to fade
Almost like you knew that day was goodbye
Sometimes at random, I still break down and cry
Your mama told me we went to daycare together
The things we forget…I’m trying to get better
As the years go by, as the tear flow dries
Leaving lines on my face in their place
My friend, you can never be replaced
But now I’m never alone

Random thoughts on a Sunday morning (Culture and Personalization)

Yesterday, I was in a Voxer group, catching up on what felt like 50 million messages that I’d missed throughout the week. I listened at 4x speed, as I often do, so some of the gist may have been lost. Someone mentioned something about culture, and someone (else?) mentioned something about personalization.

Untitled drawing (3)

This got me to thinking about the interplay between culture and personalization. Personalization is a popular buzzword in education. I have taken a dislike to most buzzwords because too often, they lose their meaning and become corrupted and diluted. It’s like a game of edu-telephone. But sometimes if you go past all of those layers of muck, there’s still something valuable.

I do believe in personalization. Last week on a Google Innovator panel on advocacy, Jennie Magiera spoke of the difference between “every child” and “each child.” She preferred the latter, because it spoke to the uniqueness that each child brings, as opposed to the uniform connotation of every child. Each child has his/her own experiences, background, knowledge, culture, dreams, challenges, interests, and more. All of those intersect to make each person different.


Let’s take one piece of that…culture. What is your culture?

In a different Voxer group, a few weeks ago, a friend asked us to identify the five cultural traits that play the strongest role in our lives. I can’t remember exactly what I said, but it went something like:

  1. Black
  2. Woman
  3. Haitian
  4. Middle class
  5. Non-religious

Other friends chimed in, with many of them saying “educator,” “parent,” and other things I hadn’t even thought of putting on my list. But these are all true. We each belong to an infinite amount of cultures, and the combination of these cultures is the intersectionality that makes us unique.

For any of these five cultural traits I listed, I no doubt have common experiences with most other people sharing that trait. For example, at the top of my list is being Black. When I see another Black person (especially in America), chances are that we have some common experiences, at a bare minimum. These experiences may lead us to have shared perspectives, which influence other things that we may then also have in common. But might this look different if I’m interacting with a Black woman or Black man?

Absolutely.

Being a Black woman comes with its own unique set of experiences. If you can picture a Google search, our terms would be

Screen Shot 2017-04-02 at 10.14.49 AM

which would cut our number of hits roughly in half.

Now, if I expanded this search to

Screen Shot 2017-04-02 at 10.16.05 AM.png

this would also have some relevant hits, but if I wanted to find the “Culture of Sarah-Jane Thomas” page, I’d have to keep searching.

Black AND woman AND “Haitian-American” AND “Middle Class” -religious

Screen Shot 2017-04-02 at 10.16.58 AM.png

28,300 results…but, we would be getting somewhere at least.


The next question my friend on Voxer asked that night was something to the effect of, “What’s your in-group?”

In-group may not have been the exact phrase she used, but basically, if you walked into a room full of __________ people and would be most at ease, what would go in the blank?

Easy! “No.” (Introvert joke.)

All jokes aside, I thought long and hard about this one. I went down the list of my top five cultural traits, and found some combinations that would work, but she didn’t ask all that lol.

I could only think of two honest answers. The first is educators, but that is fairly recent. The second has been my in-group throughout my life. I feel most instantly at ease with…

…people who grew up in the US in an immigrant household.

This surprised even me. But when I think about it, it makes perfect sense. My parents came here in the late 60s, and had my brother and (much later) me. I grew up navigating two cultures, my Haitian family life at home and American culture in the outside world. Sometimes there was dissonance, and even as an adult, there still are those fun moments when people just don’t “get it.”  (Side note: particularly when dating…I’m amused/annoyed at the reaction I get from some guys about my cultural values.)  It is so refreshing when someone understands without me having to explain.

In our Voxer group that night, I went back and forth about this with another friend, who moved to the US when he was very young. We had a good laugh about how we weren’t allowed to go to sleepovers as kids, and I referenced a funny YouTube video that my mom had sent me about a Haitian father arguing with an American parent about them. We also bonded over our respective national foods.  This has often been the case when meeting other first- and second-generation people.

This is not to say that I don’t feel at ease with anyone who is not from an immigrant family, or that every single person who grew up bicultural is my automatic homie.  But even though our home cultures are different, I feel like this is the group of people who “get” me the most, as a group.


As always, this was all a great big tangent.  What does any of this have to do with education?

Let’s (quickly) examine two sides of the same coin.  We preach personalization in learning as a best practice.  Absolutely.  What role does culture play in this?

In my dissertation, Chapter Two is a review of literature that shapes my conceptual framework.  In it, I reference Gloria Ladson-Billings’s work regarding Culturally Relevant Pedagogy.  Sneak peek:

Ladson-Billings (1992) stated that the matching of school culture to student culture generally yields positive results. From this premise, she coined the term “Culturally Relevant Pedagogy (CRP),” which she described as “a pedagogy of opposition that recognizes and celebrates African and African-American culture,” with the primary goal being “to empower students and to examine critically social change” (p. 314). Here, she talked about the sharing of power in the classroom equally between teachers and students, since education is an “empowering force” (p. 318).

This method respects the background of learners such as Haitian students and helps to avert the phenomenon of not-learning, a term coined by Gao (2014) to describe a student’s conscious decision to assert his/her power to reject learning. Au (2008) mentioned consequences of classrooms where CRP is not practiced, describing possible student behaviors including, “ignoring the teacher, refusing to participate, turning in incomplete assignments, or acting out in class…student resistance can develop quickly if teachers signal their low regard for students’ culture” (p. 70). It is, therefore, important to include CRP practices so that students know that their culture is respected, which will positively impact their motivation for learning.

According to Gay (2000), CRP practices: acknowledge the legitimacy of cultural heritages of different ethnic groups, build meaningfulness between home and school experience, use a wide variety of instructional strategies, teach students to know and praise their own and each other’s cultural heritages, and incorporate multicultural information, resources, and materials in all the subjects and skills routinely taught in schools (p. 29). Gay discussed the need to respect the cultural and individual differences of students, and to embrace the skills that ELs bring with them, such as bilingualism. CRP acknowledges and embraces such differences, recognizing them as positive and encouraging students to share, adding to the richness of the classroom and learning experience.

Anyway, long story short (too late), I would argue that while personalization should take into consideration interests, proficiency levels, etc., Culturally Relevant Pedagogy also needs to be at the core.  I’ll even take it a step further, and say that we must also include Culturally Sustaining Pedagogy.

Paris (2012) introduced the idea of culturally sustaining pedagogy (CSP), which “seeks to perpetuate and foster – to sustain – linguistic, literate, and cultural pluralism as part of the democratic project of schooling” (p. 93)…Paris suggested teacher advocacy in support of students’ home languages and cultures, while simultaneously helping learners navigate the dominant culture. 

In conversations about personalization, I rarely hear any talk of including a learner’s home language or culture.  I would love to see some research or resources regarding this.  If you have any, please send them my way.  Furthermore, the bulk of discussion I hear tends to center at the whole group level, i.e. having books that reflect all types of characters, how to celebrate all cultures all year long, etc.  These discussions are absolutely necessary.  In addition, I would like to hear more regarding CRP/CSP in personalization.


Additionally, we have to be careful not to view culture from a monolithic standpoint.  Now, we finally get to the point of that big detour we took somewhere in the middle.  An individual’s “culture” is actually comprised of the combination of many different cultures.  No two people from a given culture (even with many of the same intersections) will turn out identically.

For example, think of siblings.  My brother and I were raised in the same household, by the same parents.  He is probably the one person who has the most in common with me, but we are not the same.  He is male, and I am female.  He was born in the 60s, and I was born in the 80s.  At the core, we have the same values, but we are still very different.

So are our learners.  Part of CRP/CSP includes embracing the differences that each child brings.  I feel like this piece is often lacking in conversations about how to support our students.  Far too often, I hear stuff like _______ (insert strategy here) works for (implicit: all) __________ (insert marginalized group here) students, and this is bullshit.  Quite honestly, if personalization is a “best practice,” shouldn’t that be the case for each student?  Why is it implied that some of our students should receive the luxury of personalized instruction, while others should get some cookie-cutter approach? (Edit: I started going in, dropping in extended references about Dangerous Minds, but that’s not my steelo.)  And usually the cookie-cutter approach goes viral…*facepalm*

You know what should go viral?  Getting to know your students.  Building relationships.  Embracing their cultures…all of them.  Not assuming that just because they are Black/brown/Christian/Muslim/etc. that they like _________________, or don’t like ______________, or listen to _____________, or speak _________________ at home, or their parents have ______________________.  That’s actually called stereotyping.  Instead of assuming, ask.

Please don’t misunderstand what I’m saying.  I do think that students learn in different ways, and often culture does play a role.  As a matter of fact, the intersection of all of our cultures plays a HUGE role in our learning.  Respect and embrace that.  Each learner is different and brings with them a wealth of cultural capital.  Don’t be afraid to try new strategies with your students, but make sure you are also respecting them as individuals.