How to Cheat on Your Lunch Break to Get Fit

About two years (and X number of pounds) ago, I vlogged about how technology helped me get in shape.

I am happy to report that I am still in shape…a shape called “round.”  Hardy har har.

To be honest, I went to extreme measures to get those results.  This included counting, measuring, and weighing every single freaking little thing, giving up my social life, and feeling like crap in general.  I used to call it beast mode, but it was just a beast.  It wasn’t worth the misery, just to look good in my H&M jeans.  Plus, when life started happening, and I began to hit the road on the conference circuit, I soon realized that it wasn’t sustainable.

Since then, I’ve been looking for the perfect mix of diet, exercise, and life that will be maintainable over the long haul, regardless of where I go or how much control I have over the menu (as a vegetarian on the road, I’ll tell you that it looks more like being a carbitarian).

The current iteration involves intermittent fasting.  Many thanks to a good friend of mine, Shana White, who clarified my misconception of starving myself half to death. (By the way, I highly recommend you speak with a professional before starting any crazy diet or exercise plan.)  If you do your research, it’s pretty fascinating stuff.  Not easy, but fascinating!  Early results are promising.

What I am taking from beast mode, though, is the frequent exercise, especially at different points in the day.  I enjoy exercise, so it’s actually fun.  In addition, as my good friend Justin Schleider can tell you, exercise is a brain boost.  I love working out first thing in the morning, and some of my students could even tell the difference when I had worked out and when I hadn’t.  In the latter scenario, I tended to be grumpy and very Oscar-the-Grouch-ish.

My goal is to work out two times a day, once before work and once after work.  Some days, the second workout has to be bumped, out of necessity, to the lunch break.  What follows are some tips and tricks to cheat on lunch, and “get er done” when you’re in a pinch for time.  This is a tried and trusted method, endorsed by former administrators, as indicated by smiles and thumbs up.  To be clear, you are “cheating” on your lunch break, and not on anyone or anything else…please don’t be a cheater!

(Caveat: This is written from the perspective of someone who, when I was recently in the classroom, had a luxury of a 30-minute lunch break and a daily planning period of at least 45 minutes.  This may or may not apply to all readers.  Feel free to substitute various factors whenever applicable.)

How to Cheat on Lunch

The Wardrobe

If you are to be successful in your cheating, every minute counts.  This means, on cheat days, to minimize any and all wardrobe changes in order to save every precious second.  The suggested wardrobe for cheat days includes the following:

  • Fitted T-Shirt (one that looks professional under a blazer)
  • Slacks
  • Blazer or jacket
  • Professional-ish looking sneakers

(See Figure A)

FullSizeRender (6)
Figure A.

Your Bag of Tricks

A gym bag will suffice.  Just keep it in close proximity to you at all times.  You *must* have Dexter-like precision to be successful!

In the bag, keep, at a bare minimum:

  • Deodorant and baby wipes (or your students/coworkers will probably hate you)
  • Sweat pants or shorts

Optional items include a zip-up hoodie (depending on weather) and a lock (if using a locker).

 

The Execution

Before you begin, get familiar with HIIT (high intensity interval training).  This will be your best friend today.

As quickly as humanly possible, execute the following steps:

  1. Flee to a pre-identified changing space, preferably one that can be locked (i.e. bathroom stall, closet, empty classroom) and pull off the Clark Kent/Superman quick change.
  2. Speedwalk to the gym, outside, or your running location of choice.  Make sure you get your heart rate waaaaayyyy up, because this also doubles as your warm-up.  (This is also a good time to check/answer emails from your phone, en route.  Just watch where you walk, so you don’t accidentally bulldoze small children.)
  3.  Do rounds of HIIT for as long as you have time.  I usually go anywhere from 5-9 minutes.  You can accomplish this with props such as jump ropes, etc., but it’s also fine to stick with a run/walk combo.  Bonus points if you sweat!
  4. This is the part where you might want to ignore me.  I tend to skip the cool down when I’m super-pressed for time.  If you can carve out five minutes, though, it may be a good idea to gradually cool down and stretch.  Whatever you do, be sure to give your body enough time to ease back into normal mode, even if it’s while executing step five.
  5. Repeat step one in reverse.  Be sure to de-funk with baby wipes and deodorant.  This last step is mandatory.

Some helpful apps:

  • Runify: you can set up your Spotify playlist to match your runs.  They have pre-programmed times, or you can customize your own.
  • SworkIt: has lots of great stretches and other stuff.
  • Zombies, Run: run away from invisible zombies, trying to eat you.  When I used it, the missions seemed to be set up for half an hour.  They may have updated it.  Don’t run in the parking lot, or you may find yourself playing a human game of Frogger.

 

The Aftermath

If you have done this correctly, you will have gotten in a decent workout with time to spare.  You’re probably wondering, when to eat?

This is what planning periods are for, my friend.  In this case, multitasking is not a dirty word.  Trust me, you can scarf down a salad (wishful thinking) while grading papers.  It’s definitely do-able.

Pro-tip: Bring your lunch, or call to have it delivered right before your workout.  

If planning falls before lunch, then just run during planning and eat/plan during lunch.

Conclusion

In my experience, cheat days should not be every day.  These are for special times, when you need to get your workout on, but have minimal time to cram it in.  I used cheat days most frequently last year when I was coaching basketball, when our school team had games going to 9 p.m.

Depending on how speedy your de-funking abilities are, I would budget about 20 minutes total for the workout, including the quick-change.

I am no longer a classroom teacher, but this has saved my rear end many times.  I’m sure it will continue to do so in the future when time is tight.  Happy HIIT-ing, friends!

Don’t Be the Best, Be YOUR Best #BoredEduChat

It’s been a while since I’ve blogged.  It’s also been a while since I’ve done #BoredEduChat.  It emerged one day as I was…well, bored…and there were a few that we’ve done since then.  One in particular has stood out as my favorite.  I’ve always been meaning to flesh it out in a blog post.  Here goes.  This one is from September 25, 2014.  I’d love your thoughts.

That was the list from 2014.  (This year’s list)

(Now up to 108 billion.)

New figure: 9.25925926e-7.  My math may have been off.

What I should have said was multiply that by 1000.  New figure: 0.00092592592.  In other words, the “Top 100,000” who have ever lived have comprised approximately that percentage of the population.

Don’t seek to be the best, seek to do your best.  I was listening to Lewis Howes’s The School Of Greatness, and one of the guests, I believe Grant Cardone, said that greatness means a narrow the gap between one’s potential and what s/he actually does.  By this definition, we can all be great.

My good friend Sara Brooks expanded upon my “Connecting the Dots” metaphor, and said that while we are each just like a pixel on a TV Screen, we are HD together.  I dug that.  Actions live on way longer than we do.  Our legacy is built when we work together to improve the world.

Let’s work together to make the world a better place.

Day 9 – Fumble Recovery

Last Friday, I assigned a collaborative assignment to be completed in class by my students via Google Classroom.  None of them finished it, so I assigned it for homework.  None of them finished it then, either.

Today in class, we had an honest discussion about why the work wasn’t done.  I told them that it was a no-blame situation, and that we would brainstorm ways to make things run more smoothly in the future.

Students provided the following reasons, among others:

  1. They are not used to the technology.
  2. They are not used to working in groups.
  3. It was hard having group homework on a weekend.

They were totally right.  It is still the beginning of the year, and I have completely uprooted my previous practice of having them work solo.  And to be quite honest, it really wasn’t fair of me to assign group work on a weekend, particularly at the beginning of the year.  If I were in the class, I probably definitely would have dropped the ball, too.  

So, I told them that we all learned something, and that we would cut each other some slack this first time.  I gave them an extra day to work on the assignment in class with no penalty, and said that I’d try not to assign weekend homework (especially group work) anymore.  

Third Period took the assignment very seriously.  Every now and then, I had to tell a few people to focus, but for the most part, they were extremely diligent.  One student even discovered the sharing feature on Google Drive to help them work faster, and more efficiently.  At that moment, she became the hero of the class.

Fourth Period, since there are more students, there was a little more confusion.  Most of them got the work done, but I noticed that one of the groups was very slow to start.  I had to constantly come by their table to cue them to begin.  They claimed they had it under control, but by the end, they were panicked and rushing like I knew they would be.  One member volunteered to come up for lunch and finish the assignment.  This raised a red flag to me.  I asked if anyone else was coming with him, but he volunteered to come up alone.

When he came up, he was very loyal to his team.  I asked him if he was doing all the work (which I could tell that he was).  He told me that other group members had contributed; however, I had witnessed them being off-task.  He wasn’t able to finish the entire assignment during lunch time.  

I went to the students’ Fifth Period class and had a quick conversation in the hall with the captain, and told him that everyone on his team needs to pull their own weight.  I asked him to reinforce that to the squad, and gave him a heads up about this awesome grading system that I learned about this weekend.  In it, group members self-assess for the most fair result.  I think I’ll create a Google Form to help facilitate this process.  If anybody has a script, that would work even better.  Can you even do scripts on forms?  #PLN, I may need backup 😀

In the meantime, fumble…recovered!!!

Day 8 – Genius Hour for MEEEEEE

Today I had my own 20% time. This year, I’m teaching half of the school day, and the other half, I serve kind of as an Instructional Coach for tech integration in our building.  I’ve structured it so that Monday-Thursday, I am at my colleagues’ disposal.  My buddy Dr. Will gave me the fantastic idea to use SimplyBook.Me to help me keep my sanity…er, I mean to schedule professional learning sessions.

Fridays are my days.  Oh, I’m a poet and don’t even know it.  But anyway, I am claiming this one day of the week to handle everything that I want to do.  I have three hours of professional learning with…myself lol.

Today, my project was to fix all of the laptops in the mobile lab that could be saved, in order to use them with my classes.  Prior to that, we had issues with some error message popping up.  It said something along the lines of, “no logon servers are available,” or some infuriating garbage similar to that.  I was able to save all but two by hardwiring them to the school Internet, logging on, then shutting down.

Third and fourth periods were cool.  The kids were a little amped, I’m guessing because it’s Friday.  Also, there were some major changes to the leaderboard since yesterday.  Two players hit 50 points today.  I’m going to need to slow up on giving out points, or make items in The Item Shop a little more expensive.  Good thing they have a lot of options, or things could get chaotic.

One major takeaway that I learned from ELA class today is to save all of the high-energy fun stuff for the end of class.  I allowed them to play each other’s Zondle games right after our warm-up with Edmodo’s Snapshot.

I’ll come back to Zondle in a second, but I just have to say that two of my kids are now meeting last week’s standard (8.RI.10), which I threw back in the mix just for fun.  Last week, not a single solitary kid scored “meets standard.”  The funny thing is that 8.RI.10 was only in the curriculum once last week, and the students are supposed to hit that mastery level at the end of the year.  I think all of the Actively Learn warm-ups are helping.  We also did 8.RI.1, which we did work on this week, although not much.  Five students have hit the mastery level there.  I’m expecting better next week.

As for Zondle, the students were so hype to play each other’s games.  I was walking around, looking over shoulders, and I found some of the games were on things like cell division.  Ha!  Not exactly what I was going for, but I’m glad it’s academic.  Next week, I will be very clear with them that they should be using academic vocabulary words while in my class.

We then used Google Classroom and the online textbook for a group classwork assignment.  Both periods ran out of time, so I assigned the rest as homework.  We are going to have to work on the collaborative teamwork thing.  It will go more smoothly as the year goes on.

For sixth period, Technology, we played Kahoot to review digital citizenship.  This was a final activity, before I give them my blessing and set them loose on their gamified journey in Tech class.  Speaking of that, I will work on the challenge board this weekend.

Kahoot, for those of you who don’t know, is a website that is very similar to bar trivia, but it’s educational.  That’s probably the best way I can describe it.  Thanks to my buddy Carla‘s awesome idea, we used Kahoot as a way to educate parents on new tech developments in our county, including GAFE and BYOD, yesterday at BTSN.  The parents had a great time, and this planted the seed for today’s activity with the students.

By the way, the seventh graders totally called me out today on not giving them their Xbox party last year.  D’oh!

Day 7 – Ok, I’m reloaded!!!

I woke up this morning feeling really overwhelmed.  My alarm rang at 5:15.  I hit snooze once, then woke up for the second alarm at 5:20.  Then, I laid there in the dark until the snooze rang at 5:24.  Finally, at 5:30, I opened my eyes and participated in #BFC530.  Usually, this is my signal to get up and start my day, but today, at 5:45 when the chat ended, I just hid under the covers.  

This week has been intense to say the least.  I love teaching my kids, but there’s so much other, beginning-of-the-year type stuff going on.  In addition to the regular teacher stress, I am also the Master Scheduler, and the Tech Liaison.  We are in the middle of an Internet hardwired outage.  D’oh!  Honestly, I was pretty close to feeling burnt out, and it’s only the second week of school.

Thanks to my buddy Crystal Morgan from TX, I was able to get my behind in gear and make my exit by 8:15.  I can’t begin to thank her enough for her Voxer pep talk, which started my day off right.  

It continued to get better from there.  Third and fourth periods were the highlights of my day.

This was our lesson.  We didn’t get through all of it, but I kind of expected not to.  I detailed everything we did in yesterday’s blog post.  It rolled out according to plan in both classes…actually even better!

The big surprise for me today was how engaged my students were.  I always have high expectations for them, but today they displayed a maturity that far surpassed what they had ever shown before.  

Again, many thanks to my PLN for introducing me to Zondle.com.  The students loved it.  I was brutally honest about my approach, telling students that my teacher buddies introduced me to a new tool.  In addition, I asked them for their help in learning this new tool.  They were so patient and focused, despite a couple of user errors on my end.  Eventually, we all figured it out together.

Today, the students’ behavior was quite remarkable, especially in Fourth Period, the larger class.  I’m not even going to question it, just going to chalk it up to maturity 🙂  And The Item Shop 😀

My batteries are officially recharged. Or in the words of one of my favorite movie characters…

Day Five – (Edited) A Little Less Blah

Today was Day Five. There’s not much to report. We did a diagnostic writing pre-assessment from the county. That’s basically it. Hopefully tomorrow will be more exciting.  By the way, this is one of those short post days I was talking about.

Edit: I’m back.  Ok, I’ll write a little more.  The magic for me happened today when I got home, and I was able to do my videos for the week.  I did two flips, one for all of my students, and a secret one for captains of the squads.  In case you don’t feel like watching them, the first video was a very general recap of where we’ve been, where we are, and where we’re going.  The second one is a secret mission for all of the captains.

Again, it would probably be smarter of me to keep this hush, hush so that my students don’t find out, but:

  1. I don’t think they read my blog, and
  2. I secretly want them to see the video, so everyone will want to be a captain.

Muhahahahaha.  I think everybody does want to be captain, but this will make it even more desirable.  One of the items that students can “purchase” with their Class Dojo points from The Item Shop is a change of captain, but this is by team consensus.  I think I’ll add an item to immediately grant themselves captain status.  This will cost them dearly, my pretty.  But it’s all good…to loosely paraphrase Chris Aviles, status is the most coveted reward.  Following that, there is access, power, and stuff, respectively.  Being a captain hits three of the four, but from what Chris said, the kids don’t care that much about stuff to begin with.

My first year using Class Dojo, I used a lot of stuff as rewards.  When you hit 100 points, you got a pizza party.  Boom.  It was ok…better than nothing, but it was costing me a bunch of money, and it probably wasn’t the most healthy thing to do.

Last year, I hit on access more.  When you hit 100 points, you got an exclusive invite to a Dance Central Party.  The kids loved this, but we ran out of time and didn’t get to everyone.  I felt horrible about this, because they earned it, but you can only have two players battle at a time.  Once the list started to pile up, it was a lost cause.  I think I’m forgiven.  Anyway, this year, I’m trying to hit all four domains, but focusing mainly on the first three.

I saw just how right Chris was, when I read this blog post this morning.  A student said that being captain, even for a short time, was “the best 60 seconds of this year!”  Wow, that’s pretty deep, even though we’ve only been in school for five days.

I loved the support that she gave to her classmate.  I think this year will be pretty cool.  The eighth graders are a phenomenal, talented group of kids.  They don’t like taking diagnostic writing pre-tests very much, but we will work on that.  We still have 175 days to go.  It’s already going by way too quickly.

Day Four – Leveling Up

In the words of Ice Cube, “today was a good day.”

Feel free to press play, and let the instrumental serve as the soundtrack.  Let me steal a page from my homie The Weird Teacher, and I will kick a funky rhyme.  I can’t wait to hear Sound Gecko read this one aloud.

Today everything went so well

Slept in, still got to work before the school bell

Said hello to my principal and colleagues

Gave a hug to all of my little buddies

My eighth graders grew and now they call me short

But it’s ok, I’ll still school them on the bball court

Did some Snapshot for warm-up, #edmodo

Then we turned around and talked about the Dojo

Fourth period figured out their squads overnight

Looked around the class, there’s no drama in sight

Then we took a look at the leaderboard

We brainstormed some Item Shop rewards

Not from Chicago, no Bull, but he’s the realest

Shout out to my homie Chris Aviles

Used his model and I told him he’s a genius

Check it out on Teachers Pay Teachers

Class time flew by, both periods

No interruptions, so I wasn’t furious

I’m impressed the kids are so curious

Tech class: #digcit, the kids tried to Google us

They had lots of knowledge that they dropped my way

I gotta say, it was an awesome fourth day

Fiki fiki fiki. Take that, Sound Gecko 🙂

#lifehack: Four Ways that Tech Can Help You Reach Fitness Goals

(Featured image courtesy of colonnade.)

Hey guys!  Ordinarily, I do #edtech  tutorials, but this one is a little different. We all have a lot to do, and it’s often a struggle to find time to take care of ourselves.  In this interactive session, I’ll share with you my journey thus far.  Surprisingly, it incorporates many of the best practices of technology integration, LOL!

Topics include: building a support group (#PLN), motivation (#gamification), accountability (#blogging), and fitness apps (#flipped instruction).  Guess I’m not so different from my students after all 🙂

Oh, and by the way, this isn’t just for “teechurs,” it can benefit anyone trying to keep it tight in 2014 😀