How to Cheat on Your Lunch Break to Get Fit

About two years (and X number of pounds) ago, I vlogged about how technology helped me get in shape.

I am happy to report that I am still in shape…a shape called “round.”  Hardy har har.

To be honest, I went to extreme measures to get those results.  This included counting, measuring, and weighing every single freaking little thing, giving up my social life, and feeling like crap in general.  I used to call it beast mode, but it was just a beast.  It wasn’t worth the misery, just to look good in my H&M jeans.  Plus, when life started happening, and I began to hit the road on the conference circuit, I soon realized that it wasn’t sustainable.

Since then, I’ve been looking for the perfect mix of diet, exercise, and life that will be maintainable over the long haul, regardless of where I go or how much control I have over the menu (as a vegetarian on the road, I’ll tell you that it looks more like being a carbitarian).

The current iteration involves intermittent fasting.  Many thanks to a good friend of mine, Shana White, who clarified my misconception of starving myself half to death. (By the way, I highly recommend you speak with a professional before starting any crazy diet or exercise plan.)  If you do your research, it’s pretty fascinating stuff.  Not easy, but fascinating!  Early results are promising.

What I am taking from beast mode, though, is the frequent exercise, especially at different points in the day.  I enjoy exercise, so it’s actually fun.  In addition, as my good friend Justin Schleider can tell you, exercise is a brain boost.  I love working out first thing in the morning, and some of my students could even tell the difference when I had worked out and when I hadn’t.  In the latter scenario, I tended to be grumpy and very Oscar-the-Grouch-ish.

My goal is to work out two times a day, once before work and once after work.  Some days, the second workout has to be bumped, out of necessity, to the lunch break.  What follows are some tips and tricks to cheat on lunch, and “get er done” when you’re in a pinch for time.  This is a tried and trusted method, endorsed by former administrators, as indicated by smiles and thumbs up.  To be clear, you are “cheating” on your lunch break, and not on anyone or anything else…please don’t be a cheater!

(Caveat: This is written from the perspective of someone who, when I was recently in the classroom, had a luxury of a 30-minute lunch break and a daily planning period of at least 45 minutes.  This may or may not apply to all readers.  Feel free to substitute various factors whenever applicable.)

How to Cheat on Lunch

The Wardrobe

If you are to be successful in your cheating, every minute counts.  This means, on cheat days, to minimize any and all wardrobe changes in order to save every precious second.  The suggested wardrobe for cheat days includes the following:

  • Fitted T-Shirt (one that looks professional under a blazer)
  • Slacks
  • Blazer or jacket
  • Professional-ish looking sneakers

(See Figure A)

FullSizeRender (6)
Figure A.

Your Bag of Tricks

A gym bag will suffice.  Just keep it in close proximity to you at all times.  You *must* have Dexter-like precision to be successful!

In the bag, keep, at a bare minimum:

  • Deodorant and baby wipes (or your students/coworkers will probably hate you)
  • Sweat pants or shorts

Optional items include a zip-up hoodie (depending on weather) and a lock (if using a locker).

 

The Execution

Before you begin, get familiar with HIIT (high intensity interval training).  This will be your best friend today.

As quickly as humanly possible, execute the following steps:

  1. Flee to a pre-identified changing space, preferably one that can be locked (i.e. bathroom stall, closet, empty classroom) and pull off the Clark Kent/Superman quick change.
  2. Speedwalk to the gym, outside, or your running location of choice.  Make sure you get your heart rate waaaaayyyy up, because this also doubles as your warm-up.  (This is also a good time to check/answer emails from your phone, en route.  Just watch where you walk, so you don’t accidentally bulldoze small children.)
  3.  Do rounds of HIIT for as long as you have time.  I usually go anywhere from 5-9 minutes.  You can accomplish this with props such as jump ropes, etc., but it’s also fine to stick with a run/walk combo.  Bonus points if you sweat!
  4. This is the part where you might want to ignore me.  I tend to skip the cool down when I’m super-pressed for time.  If you can carve out five minutes, though, it may be a good idea to gradually cool down and stretch.  Whatever you do, be sure to give your body enough time to ease back into normal mode, even if it’s while executing step five.
  5. Repeat step one in reverse.  Be sure to de-funk with baby wipes and deodorant.  This last step is mandatory.

Some helpful apps:

  • Runify: you can set up your Spotify playlist to match your runs.  They have pre-programmed times, or you can customize your own.
  • SworkIt: has lots of great stretches and other stuff.
  • Zombies, Run: run away from invisible zombies, trying to eat you.  When I used it, the missions seemed to be set up for half an hour.  They may have updated it.  Don’t run in the parking lot, or you may find yourself playing a human game of Frogger.

 

The Aftermath

If you have done this correctly, you will have gotten in a decent workout with time to spare.  You’re probably wondering, when to eat?

This is what planning periods are for, my friend.  In this case, multitasking is not a dirty word.  Trust me, you can scarf down a salad (wishful thinking) while grading papers.  It’s definitely do-able.

Pro-tip: Bring your lunch, or call to have it delivered right before your workout.  

If planning falls before lunch, then just run during planning and eat/plan during lunch.

Conclusion

In my experience, cheat days should not be every day.  These are for special times, when you need to get your workout on, but have minimal time to cram it in.  I used cheat days most frequently last year when I was coaching basketball, when our school team had games going to 9 p.m.

Depending on how speedy your de-funking abilities are, I would budget about 20 minutes total for the workout, including the quick-change.

I am no longer a classroom teacher, but this has saved my rear end many times.  I’m sure it will continue to do so in the future when time is tight.  Happy HIIT-ing, friends!

Got Questions?: A Quick Fix Inspired by my PLN

First, a huge shoutout to my #EduMatch family for helping me figure this one out.  Many thanks to you all for your amazing tips.

Update: One thing I forgot to add is that my class is taught in the computer lab, so this is more so a fix for classrooms that have access to technology (computer lab, 1:1, BYOD, etc.).  However, the steps focus heavily on Google Forms.  My friend in EduMatch (as stated below) had a great idea, that works well for schools with limited tech.

The Scenario:

I recently moved to teach at the high school level, and I must say, I am loving it!  The students are amazing, as are my coworkers, the administration, and the parents.  This is a wonderful experience.

Each of my six classes has its own culture.  The only constant is me, and even I try to adapt for each period.  Over these past four weeks, I’ve enjoyed learning about my students.  I have one particular period that is full of hard-working and sweet students, who tend to ask for a lot of help during independent time.

Questions are great!  I love them, but I would prefer that students help each other, because the best way to learn something is by teaching it.  Also, it often helps to learn from a peer.  Finally, there is only one of me, and about 30 of them, so sometimes it’s hard to keep straight who had a question, and in what order.  I know it must be frustrating to wait several minutes, and to be quite honest, my short-term memory isn’t the best, so people are occasionally skipped by mistake.

I posed this question in the #EduMatch Voxer group, and got some fantastic responses.  One of my fellow Edumatchers suggested that students put their names on the board, and that would solve my problem.  Someone else agreed, but said that some students may feel shy about doing so, and suggested QR codes going to a Google Form as a solution.  There was even an app proposed, similar to the system used at the Department of Motor Vehicles.  I downloaded it, but couldn’t figure out how to use it in the classroom, without creating paper tickets.

The Fix

Friday morning, I woke up inspired as it all came together.  All three of these suggestions had something to them, so I decided to synthesize them.  The result was a Google Form that I whipped up and beta tested in first period with upperclassmen.

Ms. Thomas, Help Me!

Here’s how I did it.

  1. Create a simple Google Form.
    1. If your school is GAFE, you can have it automatically collect the username of your students while they are signed into the domain.
    2. Make sure to put something along the lines of “ask 3 before you ask me,” or any variation of that in the description, as a gentle reminder that their classmates are also available to help.
  2. Add questions, such as “Your Name” (optional, if you already did 1.1), and “The Nature of Your Question.”  Feel free to add more if you wish.  I suggest the multiple choice format.  More on that later.
    1. I have three categories: about the assignment, need a pass, or other.
  3. Design it however you would like.  I didn’t do much with it, since it served a very basic purpose, and we were just trying it out.
  4. Copy the link and make it into a bit.ly with something easy to remember. (Mine is bit.ly/thomashelpme)
  5. Open the “View Responses” form.
  6. Apply conditional formatting to make every multiple choice option turn a different color.
    1. I picked multiple choice, because it is guaranteed to populate the responses exactly how you set it up, without being affected by punctuation, spacing, spelling, etc.
    2. Multiple choice is also great because students can add their own “Other” category, if it’s not listed as an option.  You can see at one glance what the student needs.
    3. Conditional formatting will allow you to take all the kids who don’t understand the assignment at once, and explain it to them.  This is a huge time-saver.
  7. Project the spreadsheet so that the students can all see it.  You may have to resize your window if you want to split your screen.  When students can see where they fall in the queue, they won’t get frustrated, because they will see that you are not ignoring them.

I’m so excited to try this out with the class in question.  I think it will go over well, as it has in my other classes.  The key will be to stick to protocol, but once we have it down, then it should work.  Please let me know if you have any tweaks or suggestions.

Day 10 – Clubbin’

Today, we took the SRI.  Nothing to report.  Almost everybody finished.  Most of Third Period got through it a little too quickly for my taste.  I asked them if they checked their work and they assured me they did.  A lot of kids said it was “easy.”  The scores will speak for themselves.

In Fourth Period, the kids took a little longer.  For some reason, this made me feel a little better.  I think (hope) they were careful.  There are about five students who need more time tomororrow, which is fine.

The big excitement for the kids today was turning in their club pre-authorization forms.  I lead five different technology clubs for the students.  That may sound like a lot, but really, it’s helping everybody in the long run.  The kids learn some cool skills that they can bust out later in life, and I get some help and don’t lose my mind.  These are our five clubs:

  1. A/V: Sets up and breaks down equipment, and runs the sound board during chorus concerts and plays.
  2. Photography:  Captures special moments at our school through photos and videos.
  3. Morning Announcements: Produces and edits our morning announcements in the school, via Google Sites (see video below).
  4. Yearbook Committee: Open to eighth graders only.  My right hand, helping me plan fundraisers and design the school yearbook.
  5. Repair Squad: Helps teachers with basic troubleshooting.  Also designs websites, logos, etc. for our special events.

The eighth graders have first dibs.  They are super-excited, because they paid their dues last year and took all the sloppy seconds.  Poor seventh graders, last year there were no sixth grade slots left for them.  This year, I’ll try to keep this in mind, and save a few spots for the underclassmen (and underclasswomen lol).  Most groups will have seven slots, four for eighth graders, two for seventh, and one for sixth.  This will be first come, first-served.  With Yearbook, though, all seven slots will be filled with eighth graders.

One year, we even had a Music Production squad.  The eighth graders of two years ago were incredibly musical, and a student approached me with that idea, so we did it.  Last year, I was stretched really thin, especially coaching basketball.  Plus, the students were more into sports than anything else, so it worked out.  One seventh grader asked me to do a Drama Club, but I really couldn’t fit it into the schedule.  Maybe we’ll try it this year.  We might try a Ted-Ed Club later in the year, since I’m freed up a little bit, but I don’t want to bite off too much.

Anyway, I was bombarded by students for signatures, ever since the papers came out.  When they turned in their pre-authorization forms with all of the teacher signatures, I passed out permission slips for them and their parents to sign.  Hopefully we will get clubs underway shortly.  The sooner, the better.

On another note, I explained to students about the self-assessment for the collaborative work that I talked about yesterday.  I actually developed a Google Form, and asked students to fill it in tonight.  The evening is still young, so we shall see what they report back to me.  So far, a couple of students have filled it out, and the comments are very fair.  One said to divide the points for his/her group evenly, and that the assignment was challenging, but s/he appreciated the teamwork dynamic.  Another assigned points based on contribution, and had similar feedback about the process.

One last thing…as a team, we came up with a way to hold people responsible for checking out the shared iPads via QR Codes linking to a Google Form.  I played with the customization.  Here it is.

Tomorrow: Genius Day, because it’s my birthday and we’ll be smart if we want to!  Woohooooo!!!  Adios.

Guest Post!!! 4 Things to Consider when Going 1:1 (via @iamdrwill)

Hi readers!  Here is a fantastic guest post written by Dr. Will Deyamport, III, regarding 1:1 programs, tying in with the theme of BYOD/1:1 for the DC Metro Area Google Educator Group.  

Dr. Will’s Bio:

“I am a district instructional technologist, connected educator, and ed tech consultant. I began teaching the educational applications of digitals as the Campus Outreach Coordinator for CAREEREALISMcampus.com. I also spent another two years as the Chief Social Strategist for StrengthsFactors, where I oversaw and managed the company’s social strategy, created and curated content for the company’s Ning, as well as launched multiple projects that expanded the company’s digital brand.  Currently, I work with teachers in discovering how they can use a multitude of technologies, such as Compass Learning, ActivInspire, Google Hangouts, etc., to create an array of interactive and engaging collaborative learning experiences, with a focus on differentiated instruction and connecting students to a global community.

Over the past several years I have presented at a number of conferences, guest lectured, and regularly blogged and produced online content aimed at the educational uses of web tools and social technologies.  In my travels, I have met some amazing educators. Along the way, I earned a Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership and Management from Capella University, where my research concentrated on digital leadership and teachers using a Twitter-supported personal learning network (PLN) to individualize their professional development. And this past year, I was part of a dynamic group of educators who organized the first Edcamp in Mississippi.”

You can find his blog here.  Without any further ado, let’s roll this blog post out!

4 Things to Consider When Going 1:1

Infrastructure:

This involves the broadband, network, access points, etc. You have to have enough broadband that can handle the number of devices you rollout. You also have to have the access points needed to keep students from being bounced off the network. My suggestion is one AP per classroom.

In terms of your network, how many SSID’s are you going to have? Are you going to create a separate network for students? How are you going to monitor devices and the amount of broadband being used? Do you plan on capping the usage of certain sites? For example, instead of blocking Netflix altogether, the network administrator can set it where videos can only be viewed in standard definition.

Please note, before you buy one device, get your infrastructure in place. If you don’t have the set-up to handle 300+devices, there’s no point in moving forward with a 1:1 rollout.

Professional Development:

This is one of the most important components of going 1:1. Teachers will have to be trained how to not only use the device, but how to effectively use said device for instruction. They will also need to how to best utilize the LMS (Learning Management System), any sites, resources, and applications that work best for their students.

Another important aspect of the professional development needed for going 1:1 is shifting the teachers’ mindset, expectations, and instructional practices. In my opinion, an effective 1:1 does away with the teacher sitting at his or her desk. The teacher really is “the guide on the side”.

Now that doesn’t mean that teachers won’t deliver direct instruction. Quite the opposite, this shift involves teachers working with smaller groups on projects or discussions, while another group of students are engaged in self-directed learning via an LMS, which I will get into in more detail in the next section.

In going 1:1 it is essential that professional development isn’t a one and done or a lecture-style delivered professional development. Teachers need hands-on instruction. Even further, teachers need to be coached, as well as seeing the tools and instructional practices modeled for them. Jennifer Magiera wrote a brilliant piece on the practice of creating IEP’s for teachers – you can read her post here. Above everything, work with teachers in feeling comfortable about the journey they are about to take.

Instruction:

This is what going 1:1 is all about. How is going 1:1 going to enhance instruction? That is the question you should ask yourself everyday. In fact, every decision should be based upon how it empowers students.

For me, implementing blended learning, using an LMS, is the best instructional method when going 1:1. What this does is allow the teacher to not only differentiate instruction, it provides students opportunities to own their own learning. Which empowers students to work at their pace and to develop their individual strengths.

Another point regarding the adoption of an LMS is the kind of LMS to use. Meaning, will you choose a LMS to be used district or school-wide, or will you leave it up to each individual teacher to decide which LMS he or she will use? There are pros and cons in each route.

The pros being teachers having the ability to make such a key decision based up the needs of their students. The cons being the lack of management and oversight from administration. My district has gone with the enterprise version of the LMS that was chosen for our school that recently went 1:1.

Devices:

There are some amazing devices out there. From the iPad to the Nexus tablet to a PC to a Macbook, there is plenty out there to choose. Don’t get glossy-eyed by the new shiny or giddy over the new sexy. You must go with the device that fits your instructional needs. There’s no point in buying iPads if they can’t do what you need them to do. The same goes for the Chromebook or any other device you can think of.

Once you have narrowed down your choices to two devices, or let’s say you have decided that you are going to go with the Chromebook, buy a class set and start piloting them. Doing so should give you an idea of what to expect in a 1:1 environment.

After you are sold on your device, now you have to deal with the choice of carts, how you decide to assignment carts to teachers, as well as the checkout process for the devices, which is another process in itself.

Thank you, Dr. Will, for dropping that knowledge!  Until next time, readers 😀

#lifehack: Four Ways that Tech Can Help You Reach Fitness Goals

(Featured image courtesy of colonnade.)

Hey guys!  Ordinarily, I do #edtech  tutorials, but this one is a little different. We all have a lot to do, and it’s often a struggle to find time to take care of ourselves.  In this interactive session, I’ll share with you my journey thus far.  Surprisingly, it incorporates many of the best practices of technology integration, LOL!

Topics include: building a support group (#PLN), motivation (#gamification), accountability (#blogging), and fitness apps (#flipped instruction).  Guess I’m not so different from my students after all 🙂

Oh, and by the way, this isn’t just for “teechurs,” it can benefit anyone trying to keep it tight in 2014 😀

Cybersecurity in 2014

Happy early 2014 everyone.  Here is the archive to a discussion on cybersecurity in the new year, telling you how to protect yourself from various threats.

If you are interested, join me Sunday at 1 PM EST as we do an interactive walkthrough of the Wix web designer.  Oriented towards the complete novice, more advanced users are encouraged to contact me to sit in on the Google Hangout panel to share their experiences.  RSVP/contact me here: https://plus.google.com/events/c0f2aff92sve785frsa98ceek7o

Thanks!

I keep forgettin’…

I was going to wait on this post until the new year. The topic has been in my “To-Blog” list for quite some time now, but after reading this article in the Huffington Post, I was inspired to go on ahead and write it.

My long-term memory is impeccable…I can still spout off my first grade best friend’s phone number.  I remember every detail of my grandmother’s apartment.  I remember being carried back to my crib as a toddler.

Short-term memory?  Ehh, not so much.

Too Young for “Senior Moments?”

When I was a kid, grown-ups used to tell me that if I had a thought that passed through my mind then disappeared (aka a “senior moment,” as many people call it), it probably wasn’t that important.  I’ve noticed that the older I’ve become, these senior moments have become more and more the norm.  What’s super-frustrating is when you know it was something important, but you just can’t freakin’ remember!

Take this situation, for example.  Right before break, I promised my co-workers that I would burn a CD for a school roller-skating party.  I came home, set up the playlist, then went upstairs to grab a blank CD.  When I got to my home office, I forgot why I was in the room.  So, I went back downstairs.  Five minutes later, I remembered…oh yeah, the CD!  I went back upstairs to get the CD, and almost forgot why I was there yet again.  Le sigh.

The Accident

Unfortunately, these moments happen more frequently than I’d like to admit, especially for someone my age (*cough cough* twenty-tween *cough*).  So, naturally, I attributed my shortcomings to an accident I had a little over two years ago.

*cue dream sequence music and zig-zags*

Two years ago, back in September 2011, I had a bad fall.  Prior to this incident, I was a freakin learning machine!  I was built for the academic life, soaking up information like a sponge, writing papers in record time, yadda yadda yadda, blah blah blah.  But one night, that all changed.  Dun dun dun.

I will save you all of the yucky, gory details…long story short, I ended up with staples in my head, and a very bad concussion.

If you’ve never had a concussion, let me tell you, it was quite an experience.  I found it fascinating, although incredibly sucky.  These are the main things I remember, from the following week:

  • My mind was moving at normal speed, but my body wasn’t responding as fast.
  • I’d try to send a text, but I realized that I couldn’t spell anything right.
  • I would sleep all day.
  • Strangers started being really nice to me, for no apparent reason.

Within a few weeks, on the surface, it appeared that I had returned to normal.  However, things were far from being the same.  For over a year, I was very emotional about everything.  I had little patience, and hardly any attention span.  This made teaching and studying very difficult.  However, my family, colleagues, and professors were very supportive.

Eventually, the moodiness and impatience diminished, and I found strategies to cope with the forgetfulness and lack of attention span (which have yet to ).  Most of these included technology.

My iLife

My students are always teasing me about my brand loyalty to Apple.  99.99999% of the time, I have either an iPhone (or iPad…or iMac…or MacBook) somewhere on my person.  However, these products help me to stay organized.  Here are a few apps that I have found useful, and you may, too (concussion or not):

  1. Evernote: allows you to take notes, and sync them across all your devices.  Even supports pictures, audio, and videos.  You can create different notebooks to organize the information you collect.  Teechur bonus: You can use Evernote to create electronic portfolios of student work.
  2. 30/30:  allows you to set up to-do lists with a specified amount of time to spend on each task.  This helps me with the whole attention thing, as I tend to get restless unless I’m multitasking.  Since multitasking may be counterproductive, this app helps me to stay focused on one activity, and reduces my anxiety by showing me how much time I have left.  Teechur bonus: Sound familiar?  A lot of people (including the little ones that we teach) can probably relate.
  3. Pinterest/Diigo/Pocket/etc.: (includes all the apps that can bookmark interesting content for later.)  I worry less about missing important information and can stay focused on the task at hand.  Teechur bonus: All these useful links come in handy when collaborating with my PLN.  (Did you know that you can set up Diigo to sync with your favorites on Twitter?)
  4. Parkmobile: never forget to run out and feed the meter again.  Also, it can even find your car for you.  Winning!
  5. Calendar:  Ohhhh, this is a lifesaver.  It’s pretty self-explanatory, but I have to say that I love how it auto-syncs with my Google calendars.  I must have about 15 different calendars floating around, from work to workouts, from social activities to gigs.  Electronic calendars that sync across devices?  Total game-changer.  I was sick of losing the paper one, anyway.

Closing Thought

Jerry Springer, I am not.  However, the Huffington Post article that I read today really gave me some food for thought.  After I read it, I wondered if maybe I became too reliable on all of this tech?  Is it possible that I could have made a full recovery, if not for these crutches on which I continue to lean?  *lawyer voice*  And is it not a coincidence that this aforementioned incident coincided with the release of the iPhone 4S, packaged with Siri and iOS5?  Is this just a classic case of “the butler did it?”  Just blame it on the a-a-a-a-a-accident???

Ok, I’m done lol.  Maybe one day, when I have a few weeks of leisure time to kick back, I can try to unplug totally and see what happens.

Leisure time…pshhhh…who am I kidding?  I’m a “teechur.”

What are your favorite productivity apps?  Chime in below.